What is

Orthodontics?

Orthodontists specialise in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. They look for problems including spacing, crowding, crooked or misaligned teeth which are all called malocclusions. We have many experienced Orthodontists in our team who are committed to providing the very best orthodontic care to all our patients.

An orthodontist is a specialist in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. Orthodontists first qualify as dentists after completing a five year undergraduate program at an accredited dental school. After this they are required to undertake additional post-graduate training for 3-5 years in orthodontics. This advanced training includes diverse subjects such as genetics, embryology, human growth/facial anatomy, child development/psychology and the principles of biomechanical engineering. These highly trained professionals are then registered as specialists in orthodontics on a list held at the General Dental Council.

“Malocclusion” is a technical term for crooked, crowded, spaced or misaligned teeth which do not fit properly. Literally, the word means “bad bite.”

Our practices are situated in East Kilbride, Hamilton, Queenspark, Jordanhill, Kilmarnock, Greenock and Cumbernauld. All of our practices cater for both NHS and private orthodontics for children and adults. We have various cosmetic brace treatment available which include invisalign, metal braces and clear braces.

On your 1st visit to one of our practices you will be seen by a specialist orthodontist or another practitioner who will advise you on what type of orthodontic treatment will suit your needs.

Malocclusions can be inherited and can manifest as:

  • Crowded or spaced teeth
  • Extra or missing teeth
  • Cleft lip/palate
  • A myriad of jaw or facial abnormalities.

Malocclusions can also be acquired or caused by known factors such as:

  • Thumb sucking
  • Tongue thrusting
  • Dental disease
  • Premature loss of primary teeth
  • Accidents and injuries
  • Some medical problems

A malocclusion can exist without immediate or painful symptoms and a lot of people tend to adapt to the improper relationship between the jaws and the teeth to such an extent that it might be considered to be normal. The unfortunate truth is that these orthodontic problems can become worse, if left undetected and untreated. Braces and other orthodontic procedures can be used to correct malocclusions, subsequently producing a harmonious relationship between the teeth and the jaws leaving us to enjoy a healthy and attractive smile.

Children and adults should visit the orthodontist for a specialised analysis of the teeth, bite and jaws because orthodontists can help prevent, diagnose and treat these irregularities.

Note From The Specialist:

It is important to realise that even if you or your child don’t have symptoms, a specialist orthodontic check-up might be helpful to correct undetected problems which may become worse over time.

Dr George Campbell offers Children and Teenagers Orthodontics with multiple brace options

Child Orthodontics / Teen Orthodontics

While orthodontic treatment can improve smiles at any age, there may be an optimal time for individual patients to begin treatment in order to achieve maximum improvement in a minimum amount of time.

The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that a child’s first visit to an orthodontist takes place no later than age seven if an orthodontic problem is detected. Depending on the type of problem, this first visit could take place as early as age four to six.

Sometimes, malocclusions are present behind seemingly acceptable smiles. And while treatment may not be started until years later, early examination allows the orthodontist to detect and evaluate problems and plan appropriate treatment at the optimum time. In some cases, early treatment may be initiated to prevent more serious problems from developing. This early intervention may make treatment at a later age shorter and less complicated.

Parents’ Information

The right time for an orthodontic check-up: no later than age 7

Even though most people associate orthodontics with pre-teens and teens, there are good reasons why your child should get an orthodontic evaluation much sooner.

Why your child should get an orthodontic check-up no later than age 7

    1. Orthodontists can spot subtle problems with jaw growth and emerging teeth while some baby teeth are still present.
    2. While your child’s teeth may appear to be straight, there could be a problem that only an orthodontist can detect.
    3. The check-up may reveal that your child’s bite is fine. Or the orthodontist may identify a developing problem but recommend monitoring the child’s growth and development; and then, if indicated, begin treatment at the appropriate time for the child. In other cases, the orthodontist might find a problem that can benefit from early treatment.
    4. Early treatment may prevent more serious problems from developing and may make treatment at a later age shorter and less complicated.
    5. In some cases, the orthodontist may be able to achieve results that may not be possible once the face and jaws have finished growing.
    6. Early treatment may give your orthodontist the chance to:
  • Guide jaw growth
  • Lower the risk of trauma to protruded front teeth
  • Correct harmful oral habits

Through an early age orthodontic evaluation, you will be giving your child the best opportunity for a healthier and more beautiful smile. Because patients differ in both physiological development and treatment needs, the orthodontist’s goal is to provide each patient with the most appropriate treatment at the most appropriate time.

Some early warning signs that may indicate your child should see an orthodontist:

  • Crowded or misplaced teeth
  • Protrusion (overjet)
  • Deep bite (overbite)
  • Early or late loss of baby teeth
  • Thumb and finger sucking
  • Speech difficulty
  • Difficulty in chewing or biting
  • Grinding or clenching of teeth
  • Jaws that shift or make sounds
  • Missing teeth
  • Signs of enamel wear

How to help your child with their orthodontic treatment:

  • Make sure they brush their teeth a minimum of 4 times a day especially after every meal.
  • Ensure they take a toothbrush and some toothpaste to school so that they can clean their teeth after lunch.
  • Make sure they don’t eat sweets or drink fizzy drinks. Encourage healthier, tooth-friendly alternatives such as fresh fruit and water.
  • Help keep your child’s removable braces safe when they’re not wearing them by purchasing a Brace Case.
  • If your child is sporty protect their teeth and braces with a Sports Guard.
  • Call the surgery straight away for advice on lost or broken braces.
  • Once braces are fitted, purchase a cleaning pack.
It’s never too late to have a beautiful smile!

Adult Orthodontic Braces

In recent years orthodontic treatment of adults has become more common. So what are the reasons for this trend:

  1. An increased availability of dentistry and orthodontics to all segments of the population has improved public awareness. Age should not deter anyone from having a beautiful smile and a correctly functioning bite – gone are the days when your dentist would say you are too old to have braces! Many adults make their own orthodontic enquiries and appointments directly.
  2. In some cases where adults experience dental problems the comprehensive and conservative solution usually involves a combination of general dentistry and orthodontics.
  3. The increased financial independence of adults enables them to receive orthodontic treatment which may not have been available to them as children.
  4. Technological advances in orthodontics have made braces more acceptable to adults because they are less obtrusive, easier to wear and treatment time is considerably shorter.
  5. Improvements in dental health mean that more adults are keeping their teeth for life. If you are going to keep your teeth for the rest of your life, why not make them look good?

“Orthodontic problems, like crowding, gaps or a bad bite can worsen over time, if not appropriately addressed”

Dr George Campbell

Infinity Smiles

Top Questions Adults Ask About Braces:

Do I need orthodontic treatment?

Regardless of your age, orthodontic treatment will provide you with straight teeth and a distinguished smile. Whilst treatment results in improved self-confidence and satisfaction, the goals of orthodontics are not just the cosmetic enhancement of your smile – there are always significant improvements in the health of your teeth and gums.

Orthodontic problems, like crowding, gaps or a bad bite can worsen over time, if not appropriately addressed. For instance a ‘bad bite’ can end up causing chewing problems, uncharacteristic wearing of tooth surfaces and injury to the supporting bone and gum tissue.

Poor tooth alignment can contribute to pain in your jaw joints and crowded teeth can be hard to clean or maintain, which may eventually lead to gum disease, tooth decay and even tooth loss.

Another example is when a tooth has been missing for a period of time and the adjacent teeth have tipped into the space, restricting the placement of a bridge or an implant. Orthodontic movement of the adjacent teeth would be the ideal way to recreate the desired space.

Will braces make my life a misery?

Fortunately, braces fit in with almost any lifestyle and you can do virtually anything while you are undergoing treatment – dine out, sing, play wind instruments, have your picture taken and even kiss. Before commencing treatment you should be under no illusions that to reap the benefits, you might have to make a few compromises such as avoiding some hard foods and reducing sugary treats, brushing your teeth after every meal, flossing as often as possible and making regular visits for brace adjustments.

One orthodontist points out:

“In most cases, adult patients adjust very rapidly and adapt sufficiently enough to enjoy their lives. I’ve had many patients tell me that after a while, they don’t notice that they have them on!”

Modern technology now allows the wearer to feel more confident with the look and feel of their braces. Some of the appliances available include ceramic (tooth coloured) fixed braces, clear plastic removable moulds that fit to your teeth and lingual fixed braces, which are attached behind the teeth. All of these options allow you to minimise the visibility of the brace.

For you as an individual the orthodontic treatment process is a journey of self-improvement, during which you should always remember to keep your eyes on the end result.

What's my first step?

In order to clarify if you can benefit from Adult Orthodontics braces treatment, a consultation with a specialist orthodontist is necessary. After observing the condition of your teeth, gums and supporting bones to determine the potential for improving your smile and dental health, the orthodontist will make a decision and inform you of what your treatment will involve and its approximate cost. After you have decided to go ahead, your orthodontist will then make diagnostic records of your mouth, including taking moulds of your teeth, special x-rays
and photographs.

Because everyone’s teeth are distinct to them, it is only after a thorough examination of you and your orthodontic requirements, that your orthodontist will recommend the optimum course of treatment for improving your smile.

Can I afford it?

The cost of orthodontic treatment varies, taking into account possible factors including the severity of the problem, brace type and appointment requirements. Before treatment begins, your orthodontist will be happy to discuss the cost with you. To ensure it is affordable there are a variety of convenient payment plans, where the cost of treatment can often be spread over a period of time.

Braces are more affordable now than at any time before, and when you consider the long-lasting benefits of braces, they are definitely worth it!

NHS Orthodontics

We are proud to be an NHS provider for orthodontic care in our local areas, and work closely with the relevant authorities to offer access for those needing treatment and advice free at the point of service.

Every child under the age of 18 is entitled to an NHS orthodontic examination by an orthodontic specialist and we are in a position to deliver this service to our patients. Not all children qualify for NHS orthodontic treatment, but if you are concerned, it is advisable that you get a referral for your child from your dentist for an NHS orthodontic assessment in order to determine their eligibility and need for treatment.

Private options are always available to you. About 1/3 of children in the age range of 7-17 do require some intervention or treatment, and we are there to help and give up to date professional advice. This advice is relayed to you in plain language and your dentist is kept informed of the outcome.

NHS Orthodontics and the IOTN

Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN)

The accurate use of IOTN requires specialist training. Dr Ilori and his associates do have this expertise. The Index of Orthodontic Treatment Need (IOTN) is used nowadays to assess the need for NHS orthodontic treatment. Children under 18 years are eligible for treatment on dental health grounds if the grade on the IOTN scale is high enough.

NHS orthodontic treatment to adults is not usually available in primary care. We have outlined an easy to understand version of the assessment an orthodontist will carry out:

The Dental Health Component (DHC)

Grade 1

For almost perfection

Grade 2

  • Slightly protruding upper front teeth
  • Slightly irregular teeth
  • Minor reversals of the normal relationship of upper and lower teeth which do not interfere with normal function

Grade 3

  • For greater irregularities which normally do not need treatment for health reasons.
  • Upper front teeth that protrude less than 4 mm more than normal
  • Reversals of the normal relationship of upper teeth which only interfere with normal function to a minor degree; by less than 2 mm
  • Irregularity of teeth which are less than 4 mm out of line
  • Open bites of less than 4 mm
  • Deep bites with no functional problems

Grade 4

For more severe degrees of irregularity and these do require treatment for health reasons.

  • Upper front teeth that protrude more than 6 mm
  • Reversals of the normal relationship of upper teeth which interfere with normal function greater than 2 mm
  • Lower front teeth that protrude in front of the upper more than 3.5 mm
    Irregularity of teeth which are more than 4 mm out of line
  • Less than the normal number of teeth (missing teeth) where gaps need to be closed
  • Open bites of more than 4 mm
  • Deep bites with functional problems
  • More than the normal number of teeth (supernumerary teeth)

Grade 5

For severe dental health problems.

  • When teeth cannot come into the mouth normally because of obstruction by crowding, additional teeth or anyother cause
  • A large number of missing teeth
  • Upper front teeth that protrude more
    than 9 mm
  • Lower front teeth that protrude in front of the upper more than 3.5 mm and where there are functional difficulties too
  • Cranio-facial anomalies such as cleft lip and palate

The Dental Health Component (DHC)

The NHS does realise that some children need orthodontic treatment just because their teeth look really bad. The Aesthetic Component is a scale of 10 colour photographs showing different levels of dental attractiveness. The grading is made by the orthodontist matching the patient to these photographs. The photographs were arranged in order by a panel of lay persons.

In the NHS, the AC is used for border-line cases with Grade 3 DHC. If the case has a high AC score, NHS treatment is permissible. Dentists will refer patients to us for a specialist IOTN assessment so that we can determine and secure their NHS entitlements. We are currently assessing patients from the ages of 7-18 years.

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NHS-Scale-1

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NHS-Scale-5

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Frequently Asked Questions

Orthodontics

What is orthodontics?

Orthodontics is the branch of dentistry that specialises in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of dental and facial irregularities. Braces, Aligners and other appliances/devices are used to make these corrections by moving teeth and bones.

Why do people get braces?

People get braces for a whole host of reasons. This can be from the purely aesthetic and cosmetic, to improving self confidence. Whatever the reason for choosing braces, you can be guaranteed a fantastic result with the latest advances in orthodontics and specialists available at Infinity Smiles.

One orthodontist points out:

“In most cases, adult patients adjust very rapidly and adapt sufficiently enough to enjoy their lives. I’ve had many patients tell me that after a while, they don’t notice that they have them on!”

Modern technology now allows the wearer to feel more confident with the look and feel of their braces. Some of the appliances available include ceramic (tooth coloured) fixed braces, clear plastic removable moulds that fit to your teeth and lingual fixed braces, which are attached behind the teeth. All of these options allow you to minimise the visibility of the brace.

For you as an individual the orthodontic treatment process is a journey of self-improvement, during which you should always remember to keep your eyes on the end result.

What causes crooked teeth?

Just as we inherit eye color from our parents, mouth and jaw features are also inherited. Local factors such as finger sucking, pacifier sucking, high cavity rate, gum disease, trauma and premature loss of baby teeth can also contribute to a bad bite. One out of every five school age children have a severe bite problem so it is not surprising that you might need brace.and photographs.

Because everyone’s teeth are distinct to them, it is only after a thorough examination of you and your orthodontic requirements, that your orthodontist will recommend the optimum course of treatment for improving your smile.

What is wrong with my teeth?

The problems that can occur which require orthodontic treatment are generally classed by the type of malocclusion or ‘bad bite’ they fall under. There are several classes, from 1 to 3, and most people can be categorised into these.

How do braces move teeth?

Braces consist of brackets and wires. The wires apply light pressure to each tooth while the brackets are the handles that transmit the force to the tooth. During the treatment, the orthodontist will periodically make adjustments to maintain the directional pressure required to continue the movement of the teeth.

Would I need an X-Ray?

Part of the orthodontic consultation process is making sure that all aspects of any problems can be investigated and subsequently cared for. Panoramic radiographs, skull or facial x-rays and intra-oral or mini x-rays of the teeth are all used by your orthodontist to achieve this. X-rays can help to decide whether it is necessary to have teeth removed, or where crowded teeth are impacting on your smile.

What does having straight teeth really mean?

When you smile it is generally only the front six teeth which people focus on. However, this is not all there is to having straight teeth! Straight teeth should be assessed on the basis of 32 adult, healthy, working teeth arranged correctly in the upper and lower jaws. The relationship between all teeth, adjacent and opposing, within each jaw should be harmonious and aesthetic.

Who is eligible for orthodontic treatment?

Orthodontics is for everyone! It is a myth that having treatment is only for children and young people. More and more adults are embracing orthodontics as a way to improve themselves. This can be simply for the cosmetic reason of wanting a great smile, or because of ongoing orthodontic problems such as poor bite or crowded teeth.

When is the best time to schedule an initial consultation?

It is recommended that your child get an orthodontic check-up not later than age 7. Early consultation allows the orthodontist to determine the optimum time for treatment to begin. Early treatment can eliminate the need for more drastic measures. In some cases, satisfactory results are unattainable once the face and jaws have finished growing. With proper timing, children may not have to endure years of embarrassment.

Can adults benefit from orthodontic treatment?

It’s never too late to have a beautiful smile! 20% of orthodontic patients are adults who in the pursuit of a healthier, younger, appearance include straightening their smile as part of their total body improvement plan.

Wearing Braces

Do braces hurt?

There have been some fantastic advances in the way we do things now in orthodontics to make treatment more comfortable for our patients. These include smaller, smoother brackets, and gentler wires which provide a continuous light force over a long period of time rather than a strong force for only a short period. Typically there is some discomfort two to three days after each adjustment that regular pain relievers can take care of.

Will I still be able to play my musical instrument?

If you play a wind instrument then you may feel that your playing is affected initially by your braces. However, this is not a permanent situation and the more you practice the less of an impact your braces will have!

How will braces impact my oral health?

It is extremely important when wearing a brace that good oral hygiene is observed and maintained. Teeth must be brushed after every meal to avoid decalcification and plaque build up. Disclosing tablets help you to see where you might be missing brushing.

Will braces affect my eating habits?

A balanced and healthy diet is important for all of us but even more so as a brace wearer. Certain foods can cause decalcification and over time can damage teeth so it is essential to educate yourself about the best options for you.

How long do you have to wear braces?

That depends a lot on you and how bad your bite is to begin with. Complex/severe bad bites take longer. The average treatment time is 27 months. The better you are following your orthodontist’s instructions and taking care of your braces, the sooner your teeth will improve. Remember that no one else can wear your braces for you!

Will I have to wear retainers?

Retainers help keep your teeth straight at the completion of treatment. If they are not worn as instructed, your teeth will move, or tend to relapse. Retainers are particularly important right after the braces are removed while the teeth stabilise.

Our Happy Patients

“Absolutely delighted with the treatment from Infinity Smiles . So happy with the results and would recommend the practice to anyone.”

Tony

“Amazing service every appointment. Always on time the staff are always polite and friendly would recommend to anyone”

Teri

“Both my son and I have been patients at Infinity Smiles to have our teeth straightened. The service is professional, friendly and caring.”

Jackie

Call

01698 459922

Locations

Click here for all 6 practices

Email

info@infinitysmiles.co.uk

Opening Times

M-F: 8am – 4pm
S-S: Closed